Meetings and Misleadings with Drummer Boys in Airports

Or, Meeting Gypsies of the Bohemian Variety at Airports – Part 2 (Click here for Part 1)

There he was. I don’t know how, but I’ve always been able to spot drummers from miles away. He was tall. Muscular. So buff you wouldn’t believe. He was faced away from me, but I could tell he was handsome. There were a few other people at the airport cafe, but I only had eyes for this big, manly drummer. It was destiny that we were at the airport at the same time – and although I had said no to his earlier request to meet, I was too curious to let the chance pass me by. Privacy be damned.

Funny. I didn’t know what he looked like, but somehow, I just *knew* that I would know him as soon as I saw him.

I was concentrating so hard on what I was going to say to this man, that I tripped and caught myself on a chair nearby, accidentally tapping the shoulder of the person seated there. I steadied myself with a mumbled apology and turned to the beautiful man who was still oblivious of my presence. I reached out and touched his shoulder.

“Excuse me” I said, trying not to sound nervous. “Are you RD?” Continue reading Meetings and Misleadings with Drummer Boys in Airports

Advertisements

Thoughts: Stuck in Transit, Bangkok

Friday, 28 May 2010
10.16 pm – Beijing, China
9.16 pm – Bangkok, Thailand
7.46 pm – Colombo, Sri Lanka

Strange how just a few days in a new city can make you feel like you’ve been there for at least a month. Maybe being alone has something to do with it. You need to familiarize yourself with the place faster – learn where to eat, where to shop and what to see. Work out a route and routine for yourself each day. After just a day or two, you lapse into the pattern and all it takes is another couple of days to make you feel like you’ve been doing it forever.

My last day in Beijing, and it started to rain.

I looked out of my tear streaked taxi window through half closed eyes and felt glad to be going home. From one wet, exotic country to another. The taxi moved sluggishly through badly managed traffic. The fantastically smooth, wide roads, the sophisticated traffic-light system, the cables for electric buses – the infrastructure seemed flawless. But the air still looked and felt polluted with smoky rain; cars honked and confusedly veered every which way to avoid one another; drivers regularly ignored the traffic lights, especially at pedestrian crossings, cooly trying to drive through even with crowds of people trying to get to the other side of the street.

It felt sort of like being a part of a lie. Continue reading Thoughts: Stuck in Transit, Bangkok

Thoughts: Getting lost in Beijing, China.

Thursday, 27 May 2010
11.07 pm, Beijing


I’ve got House on in the background. It’s hilarious, true, but I’ve never warmed to the show. Then again, give me the DVDs and some free time, I’ll probably be hooked on it in no time.

It’s just past 11 pm and I’m in Beijing, wondering what on earth to do with my restlessness and insomnia. I’m in a hotel – I love hotels, especially when everything’s paid for and I have unlimited internet. Still, I’m getting slightly stir crazy. I spent most of today indoors because it was rainy and gloomy. The few times I did pop out, it drizzled all over me, which I hate.

This city is confusing. I kind of love it. I kind of hate it. I love it because it’s new and for that reason, exciting, fun to explore and observe. I hate it because even though I’ve been here long enough to feel familiar with my little part of it, I still haven’t really warmed to it. I feel sort of like a comfortable alien. Funnily, that’s what they call foreigners on the arrival card: “Aliens”. As in, “Aliens must keep their passports with them at all times”.

House is acting gay. Funny. Damn, I think I’m liking it.

Beijing is vast. It really is. Everything about it is huge… Well. Except the people. But even they are not as small statured as I thought they would be. It is as if they are trying to catch up with their environment. You travel the city on massive wide open roads that are pock marked with fancy cars and lined with monumental buildings. Alleyways hide smaller shops and ugly apartment blocks, but on the main roads, there are only these immense, impressive structures. Some of them are post-modernistic masterpieces; yet others look British and colonial; and yet others are just big. Continue reading Thoughts: Getting lost in Beijing, China.